14

TL;DR: It's always the best five-card hand that wins at showdown. Who wins? It depends. The Five Card Rule applies. You make the best hand you can from your two hole cards and the five board cards. Your opponent does the same with their cards. The best hand wins. If the hands are the same, then the pot is split. First example: You: K♥K⋄ ...


9

Well, I'd have to say "it depends". If you are going against AA then you are a 4 to 1 dog. Not a good situation. If you are playing against a super-rock (TAG) then it might be a fair bet that their super-aggressive play is advertising AA. However, those players are fairly rare and the average TAG is capable of going over the top with AKs, in which case ...


5

It depends on a lot of things. The first thing to consider regardless of your cards is how well do you manage your bankroll ? If you are playing for all the money you have in your life then the answer is easy here... Even with AA you should fold, and you should leave the table and play some lower stakes. Even if the math shows a positive expected value you ...


4

Yes, definitely go all-in. Most people go all-in pre-flop with hands way worse than KK, e.g., AK, AQ, QQ, JJ. And statistically speaking, KK is only worse than AA, so you should definitely go all-in.


4

I would play 99 in early position. I would do a standard raise from this position. If the flop contains a 9 you are golden. Anything below 9 you still have good odds. Anything above a 9 could be in your range (at least my range) for early position play.


3

Just gonna throw my two cents in to make you think about some things (some people might have mention some of them already.) You haven't actually mentioned anything about positions here, what position are you and what position is villain? Position is one of the most important factors when explaining a hand as our range changes based on this. For example if ...


3

This is really just a comment on your turn play. Short version: After you check and he bets, I think you should have shoved all-in. You don't say exactly what the stacks were to begin the hand, but since you say they were greater than 100 bigs, I'm guessing they were closer to 100 than 200+. You called his pre-flop reraise and played the flop and turn quite ...


3

3bet is good behind a loose player. If you think you have UTG beat then you want to isolate. You want to fold out suited connectors. An early raise and 3bet is pretty strong. Good chance one of you have JJ+. KK does not know UTG is loose. Since UTG had to think about it he probably had blockers to JJ, TT or AK. To call that all in they need to be ...


2

I believe fake bet patterns work best for inducing bluffs. At the lower limits that I play, you frequently see players raise preflop, continuation bet the flop, then check the turn if called and they don't have a strong hand. If you are actually holding a monster and think a TAG is floating you, then go ahead and copy this pattern. You'll often get an extra ...


2

It's certainly possible to fake tells. However whatever you will show will be a tell, and good players will take note of it. Experienced players at high stakes may fake tells too sometimes. Now, I think faking tells is possible maybe at the beginning of the game when you are fresh and stakes are still low. As you go further in a tournament, or after 5 hours ...


2

Think for a moment that you were in this guy's with KK position and you see an early loose bet and a 3-bet. With what ranges are you going all in with? An average player would say something like: AA,KK,QQ,JJ,TT, sometimes 99 AK, AQ, maybe AJs KQs once in a while If you compare this average range, with your QQ, you are definitely justified to call. In ...


2

On the one hand you had the third best starting Hand in Poker No Limit Hold'em. That makes me feel that you did nothing wrong here. But on the other hand whenever I got 4 bettet and I hold Queens and I called. I was up agains Aces or Kings and I lost my hand. If you are not sure about the players, I would really recommend a fold in that situation. I mean ...


2

That number seems high to me so I ran it. The chance of a straight flush is 72,192:1 and three pocket pairs seems harder to make than a straight flush. The chance of 4 of a kind is 4,164:1 and that seems way more remote than 4 of a kind. using combinations number of 2 card combinations = combin(52,2) = 1326 number of way to take three hands = combin(...


1

A poker hand is built with 5 cards (and no more than 5). There is no limit to how many of those cards come from your hole cards, and how many of those come from the table (community cards) For instance, if the board comes 23456, and your hole cards are A9, you will build your hand using all 5 community cards, getting a straight. In the situation your ...


1

I would definitely play 99 from any position (or even 88 from UTG). The hand itself is certainly not a strong one if it remains unimproved and pre-flop it might be near the bottom of my range (depending on table dynamics) but I don't think it's ever unplayable. Like all hands I will play, if I'm first to open (I'm either UTG or it's been folded to me), I'm ...


1

In my case it would depend on the opponent. I always keep track of my play style and how it's perceived in the table and keep as much information about my opponents as possible. Don't enable reads on you When you push with your AA do you do the same when you have AK,AJ,KQ etc...? If you don't, than your move could be a read, your opponent could guess your ...


1

For three pocket pairs: One player has a pair: 13*4c2 / 52c2. Another player has a pair: (12*4c2 + 1) / 50c2. For the case of having the same value of first player, I add 1 (there is only one different combination remaining for the same pair). For the case of having a different pair, I add 12*4c2. The space for this user is 50c2 since two cards were already ...


1

When faced with what you believe to be a tough play such as this one it is helpful to review the hand and narrow your opponents range. You did not give specifics (it would be helpful to know action), but lets assume this is a 10 handed game and take some liberties to demonstrate. UTG +2 raises to $20 (4xBB) in this spot we can often assume he is playing a ...


1

You are only behind KK+. You have 50% equity on QQ+. Mathematically you should call if their range is QQ+. If they raise you a lot pre flop no way their range is KK+. If their range is KK+ then they would only be raising 2/221 hands. If you are holding KK then the random chance of AA is 1/221. I they are raising you loose like 1/4 of the hands then KK ...


1

If you don't go all-in preflop and there's no A or K on the flop, you have the same dilemma and no more information. Against all but the tightest of players, all-in with KK preflop is a +EV move.


1

If in doubt, call with KK. But there is one situation where there is "no doubt" and you should fold. I disagree with others about the TAG (tight aggressive player). This person may have AA, but may also have AK or QQ. Against this "range," you are a favorite but will sometimes lose to AA. Weaker players will have wider ranges leading to greater winning ...


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