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The number of players has zero effect on the probability of seeing your outs. After the flop, there are 47 cards you cannot see. It does not matter where they are, whether they are in other players' hands, the deck, or the burn pile. Whatever card you need is equally likely to be any of those 47 cards, and all that matters is whether is the next card on the ...


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No, you need to multiply the probabilities. Assuming your numbers are correct, it would be P(flopped set) = P(pocket pair) * P(flop the third) P = 0.0588 * 0.1078 = .0063 So without other knowledge, the chance of getting a flopped set on any deal is a bit better than 1/2 of 1%. Another way to look at this is that the pocket pairs should arrive about once ...


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Not sure if I understand the question to 100%, but the chance to receive any specific combination of cards (assumed we are talking about Texas Holdem) is (1/52)*(1/51) => 0.04%. But in your question you are talking about "similar hand". So if you are talking about another player also getting Aces the chance would be: (4/52)*(3/51) => 0.45%


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This one is difficult for me to calculate directly. Any suit can be the matching one, and any pair of seats can have the matched suits. So I just tried Monte Carlo. For two handed, the problem is simple. There are only 4 cards dealt, so the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th have to match the suit of the first one dealt. P = 1 * (12/51) * (11/50) * (10/49) = 0.0106 So it'...


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22 has an edge over AK because 22 has already made a pair and AK must improve to beat it. The probability of this happening is a bit less than %50, meaning 22 has a slight edge over AK if the two hands were to get it all in preflop. 22 is ranked much lower than AK because for 3 reasons that I can think of: it has a very low showdown value, especially in ...


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It's probably more interesting to think about this question for games like Omaha where players can't "play the board" (i.e. exactly 2 hole cards and 3 board cards are used to make the player's hand). In that case: Flushes and quads can never chop. Full House can only ever chop 2 ways. Trips, pairs, and high card winning hands could chop a maximum of 4 ...


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Definitely possible, but exceptionally unlikely that all players would remain in a hand long enough to realize this possibility. The stronger and more correlated the board gets, the less likely it is that players' hole cards will play in the winning 5-card hand. Boards that contain an entire straight, flush, or full house are rare and will often result in a ...


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Sure. If the flop comes AKQJT with no flush possibility, then everyone involved will tie


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Given the following: we know AA is the best starting hand in regular 9-handed NLHE there is no action before the flop in double board bomb pots we are considering the strength of the hand before we know what the flops are We can conclude that AA is still the best starting hand if you are playing a double board bomb pot. It may not seem this way because a ...


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