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21

First off, make sure not to call a "bet" a "raise". If you can check, that is you aren't facing an amount you have to call, then when you put in chips it is called a bet. If you have to put in some amount of chips to continue with the hand, and you want to increase the pot, it's called a raise. If it is confusing, just remember this old ...


5

@Dutch.Boyd's answer contradicts the very TDA he posted with it. B: In no-limit and pot limit, an all-in wager of less than a full raise does not reopen the betting to a player who has already acted. Therefor, in a NL game, if you bet 500 and the action comes back to you, you may only re-raise if another player has made a full raise behind you. A full ...


5

When you straddle in the traditional sense in a poker room that allows them, it's considered a "live" straddle. Several popular variations of straddling exist, but one common element is that they're "live." This means that the straddler is paying for the privilege of acting last in the pre-flop round of betting. If the dealer in your example is saying that ...


4

In most card rooms, the raise to $11 is perfectly valid. Some have pointed out here before, though, that some european poker rooms use a different convention where any raise must be double the last bet. In that case, the minimum would be $14.


4

To be honest, these type of hands, while strong get people into trouble when they are out of position. I'm not talking about pocket pairs, or A,K, but often hands like K,Q or A,J or A,10 (these type of hands) get people into trouble. What I'd advise you to do is re-raise, if you want to play. One of two things will happen, you'll win a nice pot with no ...


4

Short answer: no, player 1 can't raise here. Assuming here that player 1 opens the betting in your example, player 2's all-in is less than an official raise, so it does not re-open the betting for a player who has already acted. Player 3 is free to raise here because he has not yet acted, but he elects to call instead. If player 3 had raised, player 1 would ...


4

The size of the last raise is the minimum size for the next raise. In the case you explained, player two at minimum must make it 20. That is the last raise was 8 dollars making it twelve to go, so the next minimum raise is eight more, making it 20 to go.


3

In my experience, references to a lead bet are consistent with the definition at pokerdictionary: The player who makes the first bet in any given betting round. This bet is always made on post-flop streets and when playing out of position (OOP). EXAMPLE “I check called the flop and lead the turn with TPTK, since it was possible the cbettor ...


3

Betting starts over each round with a min bet and min raise of 1 bb.


3

The program is telling you to raise it would be 200. That is 100 as a call and 100 as a raise. When you think of the big blind think of it as a bet, that is all it is, a bet like any other, as far as how much you can raise. Keep it that simple.


3

Limit games are very tricky with this. If in a 3/6 Hold'em game, player A bets $3, and player B goes all-in with $4, then player C has the option to call the all-in, complete the raise to $6, or fold. If player C completes the raise to $6 then player A may call the $6, fold, or reraise to $9. Now, on the flip side, if player A bets $3, and player B goes ...


3

• The minimum legal raise is equal to the previous raise amount. • If the previous all-in raise amount was less than the minimum raise, then the minimum raise is equal to the previous minimum raise. • If a player goes all-in for less than the minimum legal raise after the open raiser, and is called by at least another player, the open raiser will only be ...


3

Your VP would still be 33% as you could have raised/called when you were in SB and BB - the tracker will only exclude walks where action was folded round to your BB. As for the PFR, this generally means 2-bets so will also be 33% given you raised once out of three hands where you had the option to. Your 3-bet and 4-bet stats are recorded separately and ...


3

No. Player 2 can either call by putting in 100 to match the big blind here, or he can raise to any amount 200 (100 big blind + 100) or more. Then players 3 and 4 will have their right to act, during which they can each opt to call, raise, or fold when the action is on them. A player going all-in for less than the blind doesn't eliminate those players' right ...


3

Common rules: The initial bet was the $20 big blind. John's $35 all-in does not constitute a raise, and so does not affect the action. Pete's $45 all-in is the first raise. The next raise would have to be $70. There are a few places I've been with a house rule that an all-in of more than half the proper amount does constitute a raise, and so in one of those ...


3

UTG+1 must still min raise to 200 as the blind (100) is still the bet. Again, UTG has not met the min raise so you can still bet to 200. UTG+1 must raise to 340 as the last raise was of 120 (100 to 220) UTG+1 makes a min raise from 100 to 200 (raise size=100), UTG+2 must then at least match the last raise size and make it 300. If there was an all in from UTG ...


2

No, no. The "current bet amount" is 100, the big blind. Each player in turn facing that must call 100 if he can, go all in short if he can't, or raise. The fact that a player went all in short ahead of you does not in any way affect your options. For the next player it's 100 to call, or 200 or more to raise. If a player goes all-in for an exact call, then ...


2

They could be on any of those hands plus big pairs. They could be on a semi bluff with 89s. A raise to 6 BB you are getting over 3.5:1. You can call and close out action. If you fold the whole table is going to bluff you. If you pair you are probably ahead as if you pair a K there is only one KK left in the deck but you also could be out kicked unless you ...


2

1) I believe in this situation, UTG +1 has all the options that he/she would normally have. ignoring other players in the hand, UTG gets a nice advantage (if they paid attention) because they get a hint of what UTG +1 would have done if UTG would have folded. UTG +1 is basically only hurting himself/herself by raising out of turn. If any player had a big ...


2

Yes, both the professional dealer and the betting player have a duty to make the high denom chips visible. A professional dealer should stack off the chips the same way a blackjack dealer would. That is, there shouldn't be any color change within a stack vertically [so the eye in the sky can read the stack]. HOWEVER. This has absolutely no bearing on the ...


1

In all betting rounds, the minimum raise is the amount of the previous raise (or opening bet if there have been no previous raises). In the first round only, the big blind is considered the opening bet if it is equal to the game's minimum. If the big blind is smaller than the game minimum, the the opening bet is the first bet of at least the minimum. So, ...


1

If you are listening to music rather than paying attention to the game, that's your fault, not everyone else's. Nobody is forcing you to listen to music at the table, if you are doing it (which in many places would be considered rude, by the way), you are doing itat your own risk. The action was clear and unambiguous, and the dealer said the bet size out ...


1

Player 1 can raise call or fold when the action gets to him. Player 2 can only call the 15 dollar raise, this small raise does not reopen the action for player two. When the raise is large enough to reopen the action varies from house to house. Most commonly it needs to be a full raise or more, some places it needs to be a half raise or more. In limit games ...


1

Once any person checks or bets he can't raise anymore unless someone else bets or raises an amount that is more than a min-bet or min-raise. A min-bet is betting a big blind. A min-raise is essentially calling a bet twice, if that makes sense. In this situation a min-raise would be $300. P1 therefore can still raise, but P2 cannot.


1

As a casual observation most better players fold. I usually fold, because you really do not want to get in trouble. Any holding you have with the exception of pocket aces at this point is highly complicated and subject to being a big trouble hand. Rather you actually can make an exception and call or re-raise simply depends on your abilities to ascertain the ...


1

Nope, a raise is minimum 2x the amount raised. So to the $11 raiser, minimum raise would be: $7 - $3 = $4 raise so he/she could call $7 or raise to a minimum of $7 + the raise, $4.


1

It's when the UTG player posts an additional blind and thus is given the chance to act last. This action is not considered a raise to the rest of the table.


1

110$. 70 + 40. 70 is the last total amount, 40 is the last legal raise amount. 100$. 70 + 30. 70 is the last total amount, 30 is the last legal raise amount. Obviously a min 4bet is stupid here, but it is still a legal raise.


1

From a previous comment: "BB does the exact same thing as SB did, and throws in a 500 chip without announcing raise, putting 700 in front of him. This time the raise amount is more than half of the minimum, so the dealer announces that this is a raise, but the player must make a full raise of 800 total" pretty much every casino/card room I play in would ...


1

This can vary. In a lot of European card rooms the minimum raise is the size of last bet, not the size of the last raise. So let's say in a 1/2 game you raise to 6, then someone else reraises to 12. In many European rooms the minimum bet for you to raise now is 24, while in most US rooms it would be 18.


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