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4

No misdeal. It is security risk to have a misdeal because of players actions, opens up a whole can of worms, that hustlers will take advantage of. I do not know by your post if the players cards were intermingled, if they were the hands are clearly dead. Having said that I would rule both hands dead. The solution the players worked out is absurd. You cannot ...


4

So firstly the case of agreeing to split the pot. In the case of a home/private game, sure go for it. It's your game you can run it how you all want to. I mean it screams of collusion and I would never as a player at that table agree to it. I'd also be cashing out as it's not a team game and as I said it just reeks of collusion/soft play or team play between ...


3

No, that is not a rule. About 15 years ago I talked to a guy who was pushing (like trying to sale) his tournament structure. He called it "Tears". Having the blind structure, and limit times configurable would be pretty basic stuff to include in a program such as yours. I would also include a few common tournament structures for your users to pick ...


3

No, not really. I would describe it more as a moot point. The player that is asking for the cards to be dug out of the muck, does not really have a right to ask to see the hand, nor is there any good reason to see the hand, the player is really just wasting everyone's time and being a bit of a schmuck. The player should just ask the guy what he had, if he ...


3

Ok, so technically, no matter cash game or tournament, cards speak. When in doubt just turn the over. In the case of an all-in, again technically you should be turning the cards over. In a tournament this is pretty much always enforced. Cash games however people are often given pretty big allowances on this and it isn't expected to show the cards if you ...


3

Action out of turn is binding as long as the action is still valid. Which in this case means UTG gun has committed to calling 15 when he called 15 out of turn, as long as 15 is still the valid action. If the action was other then calling 15 when it got to UTG, because somebody raises than the UTG player goes back to square one were he can call the raise, ...


3

It is an angle-shoot in the situation you described, but it's often hard to stop, especially if the player only uses it once or twice a tournament. It's very easy for a player to brush it off as "Sorry didn't realise it wasn't on me" as I think we've all had at least once a moment where we've acted out of turn. In cases where a player is using this ...


2

In a home game you can do whatever you like--but in a casino or other formal/structured environment, allowing the last two players to split the pot without showing would be an open invitation to collusion. Likewise, allowing the players to decide things like misdeals after they've seen cards is not going to be fair to all players. House dealers and floor ...


2

This will be a split pot in every case except when one player makes a flush. Because they have different suits, it is possible for the board to come out like J♦️ 3♦️ T♦️ 6♦️ 5♣ for player A to make a flush and win. Suit rankings are not used in determining the strength of a hand in poker.


2

As I pretty much always say in questions around a home game, yes go ahead, as long as something is agreed by everyone it's fine. It's important everyone agrees and that it's above the table as a deal. As Jon said in his comment, as long as the chips and cash match at the end it's all good. Likewise as you said too, there is nothing stopping you from using ...


2

I am guessing you have a home game here, but I am going to answer with typical card room rule. Once a player selects the 2 cards they want to play in the showdown, are the mucked cards still in play? A player needs four cards tabled (IE Turned face up) to have a claim on any part of the pot. In a casino if you turned up two cards and mucked the other two ...


2

Wild cards are typically a "house rule" sort of thing. I have played a few games in a real casino setting that used one or two "bugs". A "bug" is a card (typically a Joker) that can be used to fill a straight or flush, but is otherwise just an Ace. So, for example, A-Joker-3-5-7 is a pair of aces, 3-4-Joker-6-7 is a 7-high ...


2

In general no, unless asked the dealer shouldn't touch or count the chips. While not a hard rule or anything from what I can recall, it's better to just wait until asked. Some players like to use speech play and interact with the all-in player. I've seen some players get very upset when a dealer has just dived into counting the chips. It's not a hard rule ...


2

Looks like you said call and pushed chips out. You absolutely called. Very wrong ruling. It's extremely common to see people call bets by just putting a single chip out. When you say the words "I call", there is no ifs or buts regardless of chips placed on the table that you have called whatever the bet is.


2

If a player is in last position, facing an all-in bet of more than his stack, moving chips across the line (or with significant forward motion if there's no betting line) is equivalent to saying "I call", even it it's only one chip. At that point, the hand should be over and go to showdown. This ruling is so monstrously wrong I suspect you are ...


1

I think it's typically up to the cardroom or casino as to the price and amount of chips you can get. Most places I've seen that have offered both rebuys and addons have had a starting stack add-on, although I have seen it lower than starting stack too. I think it probably depends on how much the add-on and rebuy are giving. If it's the same amount of chips ...


1

Yes it can be a dead hand, or a misdeal. Generally speaking if there is no action, it is a misdeal. If there is action it is a dead hand. of course rules vary.


1

In a casino setting, a hand has not been shown until all cards are properly tabled. Once a player's complete hand is face-up on the table, yes, the dealer and other players may assist in reading the hand, and he is eligible to win the pot. Any player not showing all his cards is legally the equivalent of showing none of them. The dealer may encourage the ...


1

http://www.suffe.cool/poker/7462.html Contains a list of all 7,462 equivalence classes. If you want all 2+ million distinct hands instead, it would be quicker to write a program to generate them than it would be to download an already made list. Using that list as a lookup table to evaluate hands wouldn't be very efficient; you'd either have to pre-sort the ...


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