6

Your M is 4 which is in the red zone (as Harrington explains in his zone system), and you have a perfect hand for shoving, even against 7 other guys. Since you're in UTG this makes it an even easier easier shove; you don't want to get hit by blinds and end up with around 7 blinds and way less fold equity, aren't you? If you double here with an excellent ...


2

This sort of depends on the type of tournament as well. In a Turbo or Hyper I will shove any Ace when i get that low as you need a double up quick. It also depends on the table dynamic, if you have got people willing to call you with any two then you need to tighten up your range slightly. Otherwise your A5 will be victim to someones 2 7 offsuit when they ...


2

Yes a Chip Leader(CL) can still be short stacked. If you are CL you should look at the other stacks left to play and base your push/fold strategy on your opponents stacks. The smallest stack out of you or your opponent left to play is known as "effective stack" So in your scenario you have the CL, the second largest stack is 10bb. Assuming that all other ...


2

I mentioned the thread in R.G.P (rec.gambling.poker a news group) called "Rose Colored Glasses" about playing short. I tried to find archive but could not. The title meant that the player playing short was seeing the game through rose colored glasses, meaning all the players had the same size stack as the player seeing the game through rose colored glasses. ...


2

Well one way to check the math will be to use some equity calculator and evaluate your AX hand against (X-1) opponents with random hands. I used online calculator at http://propokertools.com/ This is what I got: A2 against 1 player : you: 55.5% equity; opp : 44.5% A3 against 2 players: you: 37% equity; opps: 31,5% A4 against 3 players: you: 28% equity; ...


2

If the blinds are 1 and 2 for a total of 3. Harrington green zone is 20 orbits. At 60 chips the pro is able to pick spots. Pro could play tight get it in 2:1 and still lose a couple early hands. Some where around 20 orbits the pro is probably even money. Pro has to play at least 30% or get rapidly blinded off. At best he is going to be 3:2. He will lose ...


1

I don't know if there's any theory out there that applies directly to this, but I'd say there's more of a consensus that the deeper the stack sizes get relative to blinds, the better the environment is for a world-class player versus a novice, and stack sizes relative to each other become less important. In the example you give, you're right that the novice ...


1

In cash game, this question would make no sense, as players are free to leave the table or add to their stack after any hand, and it would be a bad strategy for world class player to remain playing short stacked against a novice. In tournament game, M-ratio theory addresses on how stack size should affect play style. With each round costing 3 chips in ...


1

Both you and your friend are correct You: Perfect move It's never optimal to shove AQo with 8 players, especially UTG but you increased your stack by 6900/27000 = 26% Considering the advantage that may give you over equi-stacks if the FT comes down to a grind - your ability to fold 1-2 more BBs and your ability to squeeze other players - I like the play. ...


1

You have 9 BB, or, if my math is right, an M of about 1.5. That in itself is when you are looking to shove all-in with just the type of hand you had. In addition, any time you raise more than about 1/3 or 1/4 of your stack, you should go all-in. As for only getting called by a dominating hand, well, that depends on your image. If you have a somewhat loose ...


1

There are several components to your question, and I will do my best to address each of them. How should my stack size affect my range? That is a very complex matter, and I will assume you mean preflop hand range to simplify it. As a general rule, the larger your stack is relative to the big blind, the more speculative hands gain in value. By speculative ...


1

Yes you should consider limps as action because if you have only M of 2 and he already put 1 BB he gets good pot odds and he is very likely to call. That said with such a low stack you have to take action and if you do not have any reason to believe a lot more people will call you should still go in. If he limps 1/4 of his hands you will get your flip most ...


1

Sorry for the sick bump. First off about me. I used to be an online pro between 2008 to 2014, with my main game being 10/20 6max of NL and PLO, though I have played as high as 200/400. Short stacking is often a misunderstood "strategy". It gets a bad rap because of ratholers, but it's not all that bad of an idea for most people (provided you know how to ...


1

To be honest, that's generally done in poker. However, People overestimate low aces (A2 etc). The funny thing is that it goes the exact same way with low pocket pairs (but that's out of the question). Having A2 against a simple T7 (for example) would almost be a coinflip. People often think they are miles ahead when they get a low ace versus something KQ etc....


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