10

You also have to take into account whether you are playing a tournament or Cashgame. For tournaments, the ruling is as described by Radu Murzea In Cashgames, there is usually no showdown until the river is dealt. The player who has gone all in has to show his cards first. The player who called can then still muck his cards if he cannot beat his opponents ...


6

The rule is: The cards must be shown in the case of all-in when there are no more possible moves (fold/check/bet/raise) to be made by any of the players that are in the hand. Now, this happens when: all the chips of the participanting players are in the pot there is only player in the hand that has chips. This is so because, since he's the only one left ...


4

This is a case that calls for some floorman discretion. If the dealer clearly told the player to show his hand, and he complied, there's no way in hell I'm penalizing a player for that--I'll give the dealer a talking to later, because the only fair ruling I can make for player 3 partly screws player 1, and that ruling would be to treat the situation as I ...


3

You only have to show your hand when you are up against at least one other, still not mucked hand and you want to claim the pot. You never have to show your cards otherwise. In this case you are the only one eligible for the pot and thus you don't have to show your hand. It is funny that he demands you to show your hand. The person that made the last ...


3

There are at least two different ways to play high-low split poker: "declare" and "cards speak". With the "declare" option there's also "in-turn" and "simultaneous" (simultaneous declarations are done by players arranging chips in their hand under the table and exposing them at the same time). The exact rules ...


3

In a cash game typically yes. You would just muck your hand. It is not really a fold at that point. In a typical cash game if the better shows the caller can muck without showing. In a tournament no as that could be used to dump chips.


3

I am not a dealer. There are some dealers on this site. There are no universal rules on showing. It depend on cash or tournament. In a tournament when everyone is all-in (or call the all-in) you turn the cards face up immediately. This is to not allow chip dumping. I a cash game it varies. Typically you don't have to show before the river. It would ...


3

As long as other active players are in the hand, the cards should be kept face down, so as not to influence the decisions of the other players.


2

If you request to see the hand , and it has not disappeared into the depths of the muck it can be shown. If the hand is shown it is generally a live hand, so you must show a better hand to claim the pot. Saken in reply to your comment it gets unclear if a hand is live or not if the player has mucked it. There are standards for what a folded hand is that ...


2

Funny that I should come across this question shortly after leaving this comment. To expand on it: As always, the answer is "follow the rules of the house you're in." Most poker rooms in casinos (at least, the ones I've seen) will address this issue in the fine print of their rules, which you can usually find online and at the registration desk/...


2

Player 3's hand may be dead, or may not be dead, it depends entirely on the casino/cardclub. I have never been in any casino/card club, worked at or played in that has had this rule but please note there 100% are cardrooms and casinos that will consider the hand dead. In the casinos/cardrooms that won't kill the hand, the player will have to play with their ...


2

A showdown happens when all the betting is done, and it is time to show cards. The rule you quoted "All players in a showdown must show all of their cards. You may not muck your hand during a showdown even if someone has already shown a better hand." is not very common anymore. However long ago it was the standard rule when it comes to showdown. The ...


1

This is tricky, and the exact timing of when things are done is important. When player 2 called, the hand went to showdown. At this point, both players are entitled to see their opponents hand on request, and if hands are shown, best hand wins. If player 1 merely announces "good call" or the like, that has no effect. If he releases control of his ...


1

This is a good question. First point: Player 1 asks to see winning hand of Player 2, as he’s under the impression a winning hand still has to be shown in showdown to qualify for the pot. The contention that the player has to show his hand to win the pot is simply without base in the rules or logic. If the last live hand standing does not win the pot whom ...


1

In a tournament, no. Folding an eligible hand is not allowed. This is to prevent teams from dumping chips to each other. In cash games, it's fine. However, a player who calls your bet is entitled to see your hand if he wishes, at his own risk. He may ask the dealer or floorman to show the hand, and if they can do so they will, but the hand will be ruled live:...


1

This would not count as a misdeal since the outcome of the hand would not have been changed. If you are playing a cash game it makes no difference what you do. If you're playing a home game/casino game simply let the house deal with and dispute. In this instance you didn't do anything wrong. I suspect the misdeal call had a "crap I don't have a hand" tone ...


1

After reading the question and your own response (https://poker.stackexchange.com/a/2704/88), it doesn't seem that much of a problem. Firstly, you don't have to show your hand at all, ever. Although, if you don't you can't "claim" the hand. You must show a winning hand to take a pot. That's a general rule. Secondly, the order of play matters in this case ...


1

If you are the only two people left in the hand, then yes you should show your cards. If there are others still in the hand then you SHOULD still keep your cards hidden as you still have action to come. If there are 2 Aces on the board and you show pocket Aces, this will dramatically affect the future decisions of the other players. This is why this is ...


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