9

I am angered enough at the other two answers here to move my comments to an actual attempt at an answer. I think they really miss the point. In short: This behavior from the big blind is illegal collusion and deserving of a penalty. The intent of the BB here is obviously to signal to the SB that he is no threat in the hand. That's a big deal. This is a ...


4

Well, IMHO, your analysis is pretty good. However, you see this kind of play all the time even in big tournaments. And in general, this play from the A8 is usually not a bad one. Whenever you have a super-short stack (really anything under 10 BBs) then they are capable of pushing with just about anything. In fact, there comes a time that it just doesn't ...


4

• The minimum legal raise is equal to the previous raise amount. • If the previous all-in raise amount was less than the minimum raise, then the minimum raise is equal to the previous minimum raise. • If a player goes all-in for less than the minimum legal raise after the open raiser, and is called by at least another player, the open raiser will only be ...


3

yes, pokernow.club is a great site that lets you customize the game, including the time limit to make a decision. you and your friend can all play from a browser.


3

A lot of this answer is going to depend on the other players and their skill level and how they see your bet. For example, I play a lot of live games in Las Vegas. I would never do this move because most tourists cannot fold top pair. They would always call something like this. Why? Because tourists don't fly in from around the world to not gamble with their ...


3

This is really easy (no brainer) shove, there is no way this can not be profitable, maybe only in some rare bubble situation. He has only 5BB, if you raise even just to 2BB, the pot on flop will be 4BB and his stack will be 3BB. This means he is really pot commited and needs to push rest of his stack into the pot anyway. Also, you have hand that is very ...


2

Now that you've edited to indicate the SB limped in and you were already in the money, and in consideration of stack sizes between hero and villain (and without consideration for the other unknown stack sizes -- though that could change things), I think your push is likely the right thing to have done. I would generally expect the SB to fold rather than ...


2

Bluffing out of position is a craps shoot at best. You can pretty much bet much less then you are thinking. Straight and flush draws become unfavorable at something less then a pot size bet head up, and I would think that the only place you might want to attempt this play is head up, unless you are picking up a bunch of weakness tells. The higher your ...


2

IMHO there is a difference between etiquette, house rules and gamesmanship. I've yet see a house game, casino game or big tournament that has a rule against what the BB said. However, they might. But that would be a silly rule, IMHO. You are usually not allowed to talk about the exact cards in your hand, in the same sense that you shouldn't turn your ...


2

The method I use to estimate tournament duration is: Calculate total chips in play Divide by two to get average stack heads up Estimate likely stack size in BBs at heads up (so for turbos likely to be 10-20BBs, regular tournys 20BBs+) Work out which blind level in the tournament structure corresponds to the numbers in 2 and 3 Which gives us: likely ...


2

I disagree with seeveral things in Grinch's post : the fact the average stack is 6BB has no impact on wether you should min raise or open shove your 10bb stack. It only impacts your range, which should be tighter because of $ev. The only valid possible reason to just minraise with 10bb or less effective stack would be to exploit very weak opponents. ...


2

It really depends on the type of sng you're playing and the stack of your opponents. It does not make sense to shove your 10BBs when the table average is 6BBs. If you're playing a normal sng with a standard slower clock I feel it's pretty correct to play as you would a MTT for your shoving range. However I think you should be a small bit tighter with your ...


2

It really depends. Under 15BB is almost always a push or a fold. In early position you can shove up to around 18BB. In late position you can shove up to around 20BB. Blind versus blind you can shove up to around 25BB. But these are just general guidelines. You certainly shouldn't shove your entire range for example blind versus blind when you have 25BB, but ...


2

There is a theoretical basis behind this assumption. Since the odds of a person winning a tournament is the inverse of the odds of everyone else losing, gambler's ruin comes into play. Intuitively, if you have 100% of the chips you'll win 100% of the time; if you have 0% of the chips you'll win 0% of the time; if you have 50% of the chips against an even ...


2

I don't think your logic makes sense. I think you're right that if another player in late position calls, it will be leaving attractive odds for the players still to act. However, that's still a big barrier with the stack sizes of less than 50 bb. If there's just a single caller (say it's the initial raiser), there's 19 bb in the pot before the flop, so the ...


2

I know this is coming a bit late but I did not see anyone comment on the specific size. Stealing the pot can be profitable so depending on the board you might be right on target with the steal attempt. 3x however will not be the right size in any situation. If you are aiming to make your opponents fold draws (again depending on board) 4/5 bet will most ...


1

Since you are not playing freerolls, you are probably playing hyper turbo with shallow stacks and fast structure, right? If that is the case, going all-in or folding is perfectly normal since most of it starts with 10bb, and you do not have any room for postflop play either way. This is mathematically based push fold chart, so take a look at it and see ...


1

As with every raise, pot odds will improve if there are callers before you. Nevertheless, pot odds will grow less fast, since the raise is significantly larger than the initial pot. Also, first you speak of a raise by 350, but in your calculations you use a raise to 350. I would not consider a raise to 350 extremely large. Furthermore, there are more things ...


1

I would suggest that you slowly build up to this amount of tables rather than diving into it all at once. If you are timing out like you say then this is a sign that you are playing way too many tables. You should play the amount right now that allows you to make good quality decisions but not get bored. Then add one at a time as you get used to it. gl!


1

Well in general, unlike what your last statement suggests, in case you think that your 3-bet raise amount is not correct as it might be called by other than the original raiser, you should fix this by raising more not less (with QQ in early position). Remember, your ultimate goal is to play heads up with QQ and try to control the pot size unless you hit your ...


1

The answer depends on the "house rules". However I would suggest in general: if you are not in the hand, then you should not talk about the hand or what you folded or think someone has you must not collaborate with anyone. You can't make deals with people or help them you should not indicate what you are going to do until it is your turn to act Having ...


1

Although poker is changing all the time fundamentally the game is still the same. Its only really peoples strategies that change. If this book has been recommended in several places then its obviously a good book even if it is 5 years old. So you should probably take a look at it, if you get the opportunity. In my opinon the best way to continue to learn ...


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