22

First off, make sure not to call a "bet" a "raise". If you can check, that is you aren't facing an amount you have to call, then when you put in chips it is called a bet. If you have to put in some amount of chips to continue with the hand, and you want to increase the pot, it's called a raise. If it is confusing, just remember this old ...


19

In all poker hands not only the highest card determinates the better hand, all cards do. The best five card hand you can form is K:diamonds: J:diamonds: 8:diamonds: 6:diamonds: 2:diamonds: (which is the board). The best hand your opponent can form however is K:diamonds: J:diamonds: T:diamonds: 9:diamonds: 8:diamonds: So, while you both have the King and ...


16

In Poker you use the best 5 cards, so in this case no one wins...it's split. In fact, the only cards that could win here are an A, K, TJ, or pocket Q's. Knowing this, even if he had JJ or even QJ, it would still be split.


14

I have a friend who often relates a similar story to me. (The friend is not me, but has been in the past!) As always, as detailed as this is, it's never the whole story. My friend will be playing and winning at a reasonable rate, then the reverse... at a reasonable rate. When they're winning they often attribute it to the quality of their ability, and when ...


13

There isn't a special ranking rule for flushes. The winning hand is always the best five cards out of the seven available. The two hole cards plus the five community cards. My guess is that player 1 just didn't want to lose. So he made up this rule to get what he wants. Again, this is just an educated guess. I've been playing poker for years and I've never ...


13

Aces may indeed be used as low in a straight in holdem. A2345 is the lowest possible straight, also sometimes called a "wheel." In any other context, aces will be ranked higher than other cards.


12

I'm Mike Johanson, one of the authors on the recent "HULHE is solved" paper, and I wrote a fair chunk of the code for Cepheus. kuzzooroo's link was the right one. At the link he gave (not reproduced here - new account, I have no reputation to post > 2 links), you can query any part of Cepheus' strategy, or play against it -- at least, you will be able to ...


12

OK, so you have: Board: 3⋄ 9♠ A♠ 4♠ 8♠ Player 1: Q♠ 9⋄ Player 2: K♠ J⋄ Player 3: Q♣ 5♠ Well, combining the 5 best cards, each player will have: Player 1: A flush: A♠ Q♠ 9♠ 8♠ 4♠ Player 2: A flush: A♠ K♠ 9♠ 8♠ 4&...


11

The odds of getting aces do not at all depend on the number of cards remaining in the deck. They depend solely on the number of cards in the deck (52), how many aces are in the deck (4), and how many cards you receive from that deck (2 in holdem). You have a 4 in 52 (or 1 in 13) chance to get an initial ace. If you get that first ace, you then have a 3 in ...


11

No, B folded. They are no longer in the hand. Cards are tabled, main pot of 75$ goes to A or C, depending on who has the best cards. If a side pot exists it goes to C.


11

K7 steals one winner from A2 K7 wins 3456 and K8 does not K8 does not steal 4567 as A2 does not have a piece of it


10

You also have to take into account whether you are playing a tournament or Cashgame. For tournaments, the ruling is as described by Radu Murzea In Cashgames, there is usually no showdown until the river is dealt. The player who has gone all in has to show his cards first. The player who called can then still muck his cards if he cannot beat his opponents ...


10

Open Limp: When the first player enters the pot by limping in. Explained When a player is first to enter the pot and simply limps they are making a call of the big blind. This is generally considered to be a weak-passive play typified by beginning poker players. Example The small blind is $5 and the big blind is $10 in a live poker game. The first two ...


10

This shouldn't even be a debate/question. It's a standard jam. There's nothing else to do here. Your hand is too strong, there are too many missed draws, and so on. You're truly, 100% overthinking this. You have a monster. Get it in. If Villian has a set or weird two-pair, rebuy and move on to the next hand. I've seen too many posts like this. I might be ...


10

Comparing flush vs flush is exactly the same principle as comparing a high-card hand vs another high-card hand. The flush that has the bigger highest card wins. If they are the same, compare the 2nd highest cards in each flush, and so on. In your case, player 2's J9862 beats player 1's J9532, because the 3rd highest card of player 2's flush is better. This ...


9

Well, I'd have to say "it depends". If you are going against AA then you are a 4 to 1 dog. Not a good situation. If you are playing against a super-rock (TAG) then it might be a fair bet that their super-aggressive play is advertising AA. However, those players are fairly rare and the average TAG is capable of going over the top with AKs, in which case ...


9

First, as people have stated on another recent question here, there may well be cheating by players in online poker. But what you're describing is not all that fishy. You don't describe the pre-flop action or how many players were in the hand. You also don't describe the suits of your hand, the flop and the villain's hand, which I'd argue has at least a ...


9

The ideal max number at a regular-size table is 9 players and a dealer. 10 is also not uncommon. Some larger tournaments will occasionally place 11 at a table in the early stages until the field is narrowed a little. Any more than that and you'll have a game that is super tight, both in terms of the poker and the space available to you. The theoretical max ...


9

This is called "rabbit hunting," or just "rabbiting." Many casinos and card rooms explicitly prohibit it in their "rules and regulations" document (example). If you want to try your luck with asking individual dealers to bend the rules... well, do so at your own risk. For home games, there's no single definitive rule about whether rabbiting is allowed or ...


9

Focus on playing hands that have polarized showdown value. High flush draws and pocket pairs (preflop) are good examples. Basically, against passive callers, the difficulty is that you don't gain information about what they have during the hand, so you have to play only hands where you can be sure you're either leading or losing with high certainty, and then ...


9

I am going to ignore the bet amounts and your stack size first and give you a general answer, you have no fold equity anyway. Well in live, yes you can, there is nothing stopping you from physically turning your hand over and if you're all-in your hand cannot be made dead. However it is extremely bad etiquette. I have been a poker dealer for 3 years, ...


8

Check raising can be used to punish people who auto-bet in position too often. It's also good for semi-bluffing or building a pot when you've got a made hand vs normal betting frequencies. It's part of a balanced strategy. If every time you have a hand you donk and every time you check you either check-call or check-fold then your opponents can take ...


8

Don't blame the "bad players" for you losing all your money with a one-pair hand. If limp-calling a low pair preflop vs you is making them money when they hit their set, it's not them that is playing poorly, but you. They are playing profitably because you are paying off time after time. I'm not trying to be harsh, but to shine the light of reality on ...


8

Short answer: Play only premium hands (QQ+, AK). Longer answer: The more hands the average player on a table plays, the less hands you should play (except you play way better than your opponents and can even outplay them with worse hands). You can widen your calling range depending on your willingness to take risks. For example you can also call with hands ...


8

It depends! What are your definitions of "conservatively" and "good hand" and "couple of chips"? And how long had you been playing at this game, allowing your opponents to develop an impression of your play? First, you can't make any generalizations based on this single hand. The fact that you got dealt AA doesn't entitle you to win a big pot. It could ...


8

You imply that none of the players improve on the board, so we'll work with that assumption, and I will also assume that no additional money from other players is in the pot. Player 1 has J♠J♣ and $2000 Player 2 has K♠K♣ and $500 Player 3 has Q♠Q♣ and $2000 Everyone goes all-in before the flop. Because player 2 ...


8

There are 2598960 unique 5-card poker hands (C(n,r) = C(52, 5) = 2598960). 4 of those are royal flushes. So, the odds of one specific player flopping a royal flush would be 4-in-2598960, or 1-in-649740.


8

This is false. The hand will play out as usual with the flop, turn, and river. I'm not sure where your friend heard this or why he believed it. There are plenty of televised heads-up tournament matches available with a quick youtube search where you can see how heads-up hands get played.


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