28

In limit games, the only raise amount allowed is the big blind during preflop and flop play; double the big blind during turn and river play. The correct minimum raise in big bet games (no limit and pot limit) is to increase the amount of the bet by the amount of the previous bet (e.g. double the previous raise*), or to raise all-in if you do not have ...


27

If you are playing a 5 card game (like Hold-Em) then only the top 5 cards play. So, in this case, there are 4 on the table (6-9) and you each have a 10, for the best possible hand a 6-10 straight. It is also possible that you have AA, and friend KK, but the board comes out 3-4-5-6-7 and you split as you both play the best hand - the board.


24

In a cash game, never fold AA preflop. You're always ahead. The only time this might be reasonable is in a tournament, and the reasons would relate directly to ICM calculations. Even then, the situations will be rare where folding AA is reasonable.


23

The general rule of thumb from me would be to stick with the same raise you would make in the same situation with T9s. You want to balance your range so that you get a good mix of action with your great hands and folds with your steals. What that raise should be will depend a lot on your history with the blinds and on their stack sizes. Whether we are ...


19

Not sure if it covers the games you're looking for but it's a useful resource to mention anyway. University of Alberta Computer Poker Research Group Database has something like 10 Million hands for free to download. Check it out. As a side note, their papers about Poker AI and decision making are always very insightful.


19

In all poker hands not only the highest card determinates the better hand, all cards do. The best five card hand you can form is K:diamonds: J:diamonds: 8:diamonds: 6:diamonds: 2:diamonds: (which is the board). The best hand your opponent can form however is K:diamonds: J:diamonds: T:diamonds: 9:diamonds: 8:diamonds: So, while you both have the King and ...


19

First off, make sure not to call a "bet" a "raise". If you can check, that is you aren't facing an amount you have to call, then when you put in chips it is called a bet. If you have to put in some amount of chips to continue with the hand, and you want to increase the pot, it's called a raise. If it is confusing, just remember this old poker adage: "You can'...


16

Theoretically, no. For every dollar you and your opponent add to the pot, you stand to win your dollar back plus some of his, regardless of his hand. However there are a few practical edge-cases worth considering. Trusting the game If this is your first time playing in a home game, there are a few ways this could be a mistake. The first is cheating; ...


16

In Poker you use the best 5 cards, so in this case no one wins...it's split. In fact, the only cards that could win here are an A, K, TJ, or pocket Q's. Knowing this, even if he had JJ or even QJ, it would still be split.


15

Please, before you continue reading and make any decisions based on what I'm about to tell you, you must understand two important things: I'm not a lawyer. I can't even say that I dabble in law. I'm not an expert on these matters, and many people who are expert disagree with one another. As simple as your question may seem, it is not easy to answer. ...


15

This is a tiny little chart I made for a few friends who are very new to the game and often can't get their head around how much of a difference one or two pips can make! Reading the chart: If your hand is unsuited, match your hole cards in the lower left half of the table. If your hand is suited, match your hole cards in the upper right half of the table. ...


14

After the flop you've seen 4 cards of your suit, and 1 of another suit. This leaves 9 cards of your suit, and 38 of a different suit; your odds of completing your flush on the turn are thus 9/47, or 19.14%. If the turn hasn't completed your flush, your odds of completing it on the river are 9/46, or 19.5%. This means that the total odds for completing a ...


14

I think the only realistic options for villain are a missed draw or Tx. I think he'd have gotten more aggressive earlier if he had you preflop. Your line looks a lot like an overpair to me, and as such, he would want to get value out of you if he had trips or a full house. As such, I don't think he shoves the river here if he wanted a call. He knows you ...


14

The standard straddle is, in general, a losing proposition. You're trading 2BB for the right to play last preflop. You'll end up playing larger pots out of position, which is a bad thing. You have to have a huge edge against your opposition to make up for the positional disadvantage. Some special situations, where straddling makes sense: Trying to build an ...


14

A redraw generally tends to mean that you have the best hand, and you have a draw to another better hand. In Texas Hold 'Em, the best example would be a set on the flop. If you get all-in against a flush draw, even though they have a draw to a better hand (a flush), you have a re-draw to a hand that can beat their draw (a full house). The term is more ...


14

Unless explicitly noted, poker hands are only 5 cards. If you have 7 cards to choose from, you make the best 5 card hand you can, and the other 2 don't count. Your best possible hand in that situation was 6 7 8 9 T. Your friend's best possible hand was 6 7 8 9 T. Since they were the same, you tied and split the pot.


13

I believe this to be a very complicated set of factors... I'll try to mention a few, but not all of them, since I'm not old enough to know them :D. First of all, Texas Hold'em is the variation of poker with the easiest mechanics to understand. All others are a bit more complicated: in Omaha there are too many cards, in Stud games there are those weird rules ...


13

Player 2 wins, best 5-card hand rule: JJKKA


13

There isn't a special ranking rule for flushes. The winning hand is always the best five cards out of the seven available. The two hole cards plus the five community cards. My guess is that player 1 just didn't want to lose. So he made up this rule to get what he wants. Again, this is just an educated guess. I've been playing poker for years and I've never ...


12

Because the 555 are not just 555, it's a full house (fives full of queens). Elezra only has QQQ. In Hold'em you have to make the best five cards out of seven: using either 0, 1 or 2 of your holecards and either 3, 4 or 5 community cards. In the deal you linked to the community cards are: 3⋄5♠Q♠Q♣J♥ The best hand Eli ...


12

My standard raise in this spot preflop would be something like $84. With reads that villains are bad (i.e. will call 3bets like this way too often) that number becomes bigger. So $110 probably isn't a bad raise size, but you should realize that you're putting in 1/3 of effective stacks and you really don't want to play postflop when that's the case. Under ...


12

I have a friend who often relates a similar story to me. (The friend is not me, but has been in the past!) As always, as detailed as this is, it's never the whole story. My friend will be playing and winning at a reasonable rate, then the reverse... at a reasonable rate. When they're winning they often attribute it to the quality of their ability, and when ...


12

OK, so you have: Board: 3⋄ 9♠ A♠ 4♠ 8♠ Player 1: Q♠ 9⋄ Player 2: K♠ J⋄ Player 3: Q♣ 5♠ Well, combining the 5 best cards, each player will have: Player 1: A flush: A♠ Q♠ 9♠ 8♠ 4♠ Player 2: A flush: A♠ K♠ 9♠ 8♠ 4&...


11

What @Jeffrey Blake said, is totally correct, however there are situations when you don't need to balance you range in this situation at all, for example against players who doesn't care and calling anyway, you should make as big bets as you can to make more profit. Also, against players who are not observant at all, you might make bigger bets, because they ...


11

When to use a low-value range There is no time when an exclusively low value range is optimal. The purpose of including low value hands in a range is to extract additional value from high value hands, or to play more hands in general against opponents that fold too often. In the first case, you need high value hands in your range to make the strategy work....


11

Your second question is unanswerable. Estimating what the mix of styles in a tournament will be on average is too inflexible an assumption for any strategic use. Your first question is more interesting and problematic. Can we play small-ball poker in a cash-game? Yes, but it takes far greater personal involvement from the player, and frankly doesn't lead to ...


11

The big four are definitely: Theory of Poker by David Sklansky - perhaps the best book for establishing an understanding of poker theory in general. This one is worthwhile no matter what poker game you're into. Super System compiled by Doyle Brunson - between this and its sequel, you can get a good ground-level understanding of any game. It's not something ...


11

I'm Mike Johanson, one of the authors on the recent "HULHE is solved" paper, and I wrote a fair chunk of the code for Cepheus. kuzzooroo's link was the right one. At the link he gave (not reproduced here - new account, I have no reputation to post > 2 links), you can query any part of Cepheus' strategy, or play against it -- at least, you will be able to ...


11

No, B folded. They are no longer in the hand. Cards are tabled, main pot of 75$ goes to A or C, depending on who has the best cards. If a side pot exists it goes to C.


10

First, a look at ranges: I think he has AA/KK/Tx/88/33 here no more often than he has JJ or a busted draw (to the straight or the flush). And sometimes he'll turn up with utter crap. So if we say it's an even money bet, we're getting good odds on a call. Second, let's look at history: You noted in the comments that Villian has not let a pot check around. ...


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