4

The size of a pot-sized raise is calculated as follows: Match the standing bet, and then Raise by the size of the pot after you have matched the current bet. The formula for calculating this is 3x current bet + dead money. Why does this formula work? Let's use actual numbers so we can see more clearly: Example 1: SB posts 250, BB posts 500. You are UTG ...


4

No misdeal. It is security risk to have a misdeal because of players actions, opens up a whole can of worms, that hustlers will take advantage of. I do not know by your post if the players cards were intermingled, if they were the hands are clearly dead. Having said that I would rule both hands dead. The solution the players worked out is absurd. You cannot ...


3

Wow, that was a great to superstar fold. As it turns out you made the right play. When I am playing well I would have a hard time convincing myself to believe what I see and make that fold, when I am off my game, I would almost always make that call. It is hard to describe all the nuances of a hand and a player. I am speculating that a lot more, like the ...


3

AK is a very strong hand preflop, but postflop if you haven't hit any A or K, or straight or flush draws, then you just have A high. You checked your hand against 5 other players and in this situation I think you did the right thing. And why? Because you are playing a multiway pot against many weak players, and weak players tend to call a lot of hands like ...


3

In addition to Clarko's excellent answer, I also don't like the lead post-flop. The awkward sizing commits you even when you're sure you're behind. K-high dryish boards favour your villain's range. AA, KK, AK are hands you're probably shoving preflop, but he could definitely have. I don't think 55, 77, or two pairs should be had by either of you, but K7s, ...


3

This hand, your problems are definitely coming from the action preflop. I dont like how you 3-bet to $3.30 with A9s, but it isn't terrible because you do block an ace and the initial raiser was on the button, potentially making their raising range a bit wider. The biggest glaring mistake here to me was your call after the button 4-bet you preflop. Going back ...


3

There are three different pots in this situation: One contains 400 chips and involves all four players. This is split between players 1 and 2. It's 400 chips because Player 1 bet 100 and four players have called/raised over his all-in. The second pot has 300 chips and involves players 2,3 and 4. Player 2 wins this pot. It's 300 chips because 100 is the ...


2

you can email most online poker sites and get them to set up a restricted game with your desired blinds/structure, and I believe PokerStars and PartyPoker (GVC) both let you create you own games via the client.


2

I don't see the jump in logic, either. Your opponent's odds of having a pocket pair should be the same 1/17 that you have. I have no idea where he gets the 16 to 6 figure. There are 16 ways to have any given non-pair and 6 ways to have any given pair, but there are 78 non-pair rank combinations and only 13 pair ranks. If that's how he's calculating it, it's ...


2

What you are describing is not uncommon. Many players feel the similarly, especially when playing for real money. There are some things that can be done to reduce both the frequency and the impact of such reactions. Here are a few suggestions, but how effective they are depends much on your circumstances. Play more: This is a sensitivity and can thus be ...


2

Good question, This depends on a lot of things, in some situations it is correct to just give up, in others it is correct to triple barrel bluff. I would say, among other factors like stack size and the type of game, the two most important things are your opponent and how much strength you showed preflop. If you are playing in a cash game live at a casino, ...


2

So firstly it's a music video, and whatever they're doing isn't poker. However if somehow you're playing some game with a joker wildcard, poker is a 5 card game, 5 aces would win. Both players have 5 aces, CHOP IT UP!


2

Just becuase your slowplay didn't work out well this time, it doesn't say anything about whether it was a good play or not. I'm more willing to value-bet on the flop though, since you have the nuts and your opponents would have probably some piece of the flop. Depending on the skill level of the table, you may get calls from all sorts of straight draws and ...


2

Slansky's theorem must be considered from both the perspective of the hero and of the villain. The first part of the theorem: “Every time you play a hand differently from the way you would have played it if you could see all your opponents' cards, they gain; and every time you play your hand the same way you would have played it if you could see all their ...


2

There aren't many hands your opponent would bluff on that spot except perhaps for some missed straight draw and what candidates for a value-bet could you possibly be beating? Not many either! Your opponent is betting almost a full pot and SB can still call or even shove behind you. I'd say folding is the only reasonable play here


2

As I pretty much always say in questions around a home game, yes go ahead, as long as something is agreed by everyone it's fine. It's important everyone agrees and that it's above the table as a deal. As Jon said in his comment, as long as the chips and cash match at the end it's all good. Likewise as you said too, there is nothing stopping you from using ...


2

Player 1's hand (best 5-card choice) is 3322A, so two-pair, threes and twos. Player 2's hand (best 5-card choice) is 55337, so two-pair, fives and threes. Since fives beat threes, player 2 wins the hand.


1

Player 1 and 2 split 200, player 1 has only called/bet 100, that is all he is entitled to. Player 2 wins 300 more out of the pot. 100 each from players 3 and 4, plus his 100. (assuming his straight is the best hand) Players 3 and 4 are playing for the remainder of the pot. A player wins what can cover. Anything past that goes on the side between the players ...


1

Yes it can be a dead hand, or a misdeal. Generally speaking if there is no action, it is a misdeal. If there is action it is a dead hand. of course rules vary.


1

what are the other factors to consider Short answer: everything. This play is common, so common it has a phrase to describe it; Follow up bet. For many players, it is almost common to do a follow up bet every time they raise, and often players will make a bet when it is checked to them rather or not they raised before the flop. This is just bluffing and ...


1

best size is : 3x pot.. If there is 2limp , pot is (2bb + 1,5bb sb and bb) total = 3,5bb 3 x 3,5(pot) = 10,5bb . 10bb or 10,5bb is a good size to squeeze. When u are OOP (out of position) use 3,5 or 4x pot When u are IP (in position) 2.7 or 3x pot When play at low level , people rarely fold. Use a big size , play tighter and better select hands. Search more ...


1

Will the OTG strategy give a positive reward if an opponent plays non-optimally? I am 99.99999999% sure that the answer is yes. I don't have a mathematical proof, but here are two intuitive arguments: Play many hands against the Cepheus bot. You will loose money in the long run no matter what strategy you choose. For the following toy poker game below I ...


1

Your play was correct. People calling your raise is not bad news. Of course it decreases the chance that you win the pot but it also increases your reward when you hit. We need to accept the fact that poker is a game where correct play is often not rewarded in the short term, so you shouldn't question your strategy just becausea hand didn't go your way. In ...


1

Equal, but not greater. Otherwise both players could use the same strategy and money would be created out of nowhere. The exception is of course if the game only lasts one hand, in which case the SB would be expected to win in the Nash equilibrium. Yes. Players A and B will be in a Nash equilibrium if neither player has an incentive to deviate (in other ...


1

Your image doesn't reflect the correct state of the hand. The question is actually referring to the outs after the turn. Hero: A♣ A♠ Villain: Q⋄ 9⋄ Board: 9♣ J♥ Q♣ Turn: 2♣ Here there are the 16 outs you indicated. Yes, AA22 is a higher two pair than QQ99, as two pairs are ranked by the higher pair first, then the second pair, and finally kicker.


1

Context is king in poker. Things like the number of players, position, the previous action in the hand, bet sizes, flop texture and so on are necessary to take a decision. Asking "should I check-fold sets?" is like asking "should I use an umbrella?". It has no general answer that applies to all cases.


1

http://www.suffe.cool/poker/7462.html Contains a list of all 7,462 equivalence classes. If you want all 2+ million distinct hands instead, it would be quicker to write a program to generate them than it would be to download an already made list. Using that list as a lookup table to evaluate hands wouldn't be very efficient; you'd either have to pre-sort the ...


1

I like it purely because of the extra space along with a bit faster action without feeling short handed. I saw a tweet today from the aria claiming that they are keeping things 8-handed. Bigger poker rooms will definitely be able to (and should imo) keep things 8-handed, but smaller rooms that are pay for time rather than rake may not be willing/able to ...


1

For a five-card hand, first choose the two ranks that you want for your two pair. There are 13 x 12 / 2 = 78 ways to do this. Then, for each pair, choose the two suits: 6 each. Then pick the other card that's neither of the pair ranks: 44 choices (11 ranks x 4 suits). This gives 78 x 36 x 44 = 123,552 two-pair hands.


1

I suggest you two option : Online with this On pc,(best in my opinion) Equilab is a free software here where do you able to save your range. Keep in mind : many poker room, like pokerstars, don't accept equilab running on pc while pokerstars running too.


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