18

You should enter the tournament as early as possible. Presumably, you're participating in the tournament because you have some sort of edge against the field. In other words, you should be playing the tournament because it is profitable for you to do so. Playing the earlier stages of the tournament lets you play more hands against your opponents, which (...


10

Sounds like you had an 18K stack preflop, or about 30bbs. The 3K raise is fairly standard, though you shouldn't only raise that size with hands like AA because perceptive opponents can figure that sort of thing out if they play enough hands with you (then again, if no one at your table is perceptive, go ahead and play in an exploitable way). On the flop ...


10

Yes talking to influence action is against the rules and people push it. When he announced the pot size it went over the line. By announcing the pot size he was coaching. That is a rule violation. The dealer said cannot influence action. Yes talking to influence action is done but it needs to be more subtle than that. From there his excessive chatter was ...


9

On the contrary of the answer above, the answer is yes, is the right move. Calling 36000 to win 87000 means that you have must have at least 29% if equity. The hands that has this equity against AK are 22+, A2s+, KTs+, Q2s+, J2s+, T2s+, 92s+, 82s+, 72s+, 62s+, 52s+, 42s+, 32s AKo, Q2o+, J2o+, T2o+, 92o+, 82o+, 72o+, 62o+, 52o+, 42o+ even taking in to ...


8

You don't mention how big are the blinds, but you say "Hero calls 8000", so I'm assuming the blinds are 4K / 8K, which means you have about 7 BB behind. This means you're SEVERELY short stacked. In this case, the play for you is pretty much on automatic pilot: find a decent hand to go all-in with. I disagree with what you did preflop: you should've moved ...


8

OK, let's break it down mathematically. I'm going to use a standard poker equity calculator for this. You have T⋄ 9⋄ You say the all-in player had a medium pocket pair. For this "exercise", let's pick 8♠8♣ Let's consider the third player a typical tight-agressive player, in this case with a standard 18% Range of hands preflop ...


8

This is false. The hand will play out as usual with the flop, turn, and river. I'm not sure where your friend heard this or why he believed it. There are plenty of televised heads-up tournament matches available with a quick youtube search where you can see how heads-up hands get played.


7

Basically it depends on some factors: the available statistics and notes to the opponents. tournament stage your stack opponent's stack General Big Blind behaviour: we tend to defend blinds against the "stealer", who is more loose/agressive than average we tend to defend blinds in the late tournament stage we tend to defend the blind against the big stack ...


7

Your preflop actions look fine. You have the second best starting hand in poker, so 4betting strongly is correct. The 3-5-6 rainbow flop is coordinated, but you worrying about hands like 2-4 and 4-7 is just silly. Think about it: would you call a 4-bet preflop with this kind of hand? Probably not unless you were super deepstacked (which you didn't mention, ...


7

As you said, it is easy. You want to start with the maximum BB's. Play tight in beginning to increase your stack. If you join as shortstack with around 30 bb's you can be an easy victim by someone who pushes you all in without any problems. That will not happen in the beginning phase, because everyone has the same amount of bb's.. as you said, easy. :)) now ...


7

The problem with with making a standard raise with an M under 5 is that you will be left with a stack that is too low if you lose the pot. If a standard raise for this tournament is 2.5BB then you are raising to 2K to open the pot. If only the big blind calls you now have a 5K pot and a stack of 6K behind. Should you decide to push all in at this point your ...


7

"A hand may be considered and mucked if player is not at his seat" - WSOP rules. This is hand abandonment. "At his seat" is defined as touching or in reach of one's seat. However, this rule only applies in a situation where your hand can be mucked. It is not possible to fold when you are all-in for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is it would ...


7

Google Wiki In poker, an overlay is the gap between a poker tournament's guaranteed prize pool and the actual prize pool generated by entrants. For example, if a tournament has a guaranteed prize pool of $10,000, a buy in of $100 and 90 players enter, the players will contribute only $9,000 to the prizepool. The rest of the prizepool (in ...


7

Great Question, some things that I find useful are the following: snacks like sunflower seeds, nuts, or gum keep your mouth busy and help to keep you awake and alert regular breaks where you get up and walk around (every level or so), also consider doing some light stretching or aerobic exercise like jumping jacks play music with high bpm. I find that it ...


6

It would help in analyzing this hand if we knew the stack sizes of the players at the table. That could change a lot of factors. Regardless... You made a few mistakes here, but getting your money in was not one of them. First, preflop: Against a min-raise (e.g. a raise that only increased the bet by 1x the big blind), it is almost always a big mistake to ...


6

My first impression is there's not much wrong with the hand, if anything at all. A reasonable case for 3-betting Preflop can be made, but that depends on the type of players behind you left to act. I'm more inclined to 3-Bet if they are mostly Loose-Passive. Clearly, you have what most people consider a "Value" hand in this situation. From the looks of it, ...


6

The common conditions/rules of being independent from luck in the tournament: 1) You are playing tournament with deep stacks and reasonable blind level lengths. It means turbo tournaments with 5 minutes per level contain enough luck-dependent situations. Not playing "turbos" will allow to avoid rapid short stack preflop all-in situation. 2) You don't ...


6

Whomever had the most chips at the beginning of the hand places best in the tournament. The number of players or tables does not matter, it just the same as three people going all in on a single table and two bust out. Whomever had the most chips at the beginning of the hand places highest. On the bubble the same thing, if there are 101 players left and ...


6

If such a player is approximating a game-theoretic-optimal (GTO) strategy, then they are essentially putting their opponent in a situation where it doesn't matter what they do. In other words, whatever information you believe you could glean from their play will not help you alter their expectation (i.e., reduce their expectation while increasing yours). ...


6

Just play your game, don't let the fact it's a live game or your first tournament in a casino affect you negatively in how you play. There is no need to fight over every pot in the first few levels. Take it slow at the start, watch the players and see how they play, adjust your game accordingly. Be aware for casino regulars for many reasons, be aware but ...


6

My comment on your previous post was about this very phenomenon! You will not get "good" hands at anywhere close to a desirable frequency and the blinds will increase quickly. You've asked a couple questions here, each of which is worthy of its own question, so I'll just make some brief points: Called 3-bet pre-flop and faced big flop bet Players will ...


6

From my experience as a dealer when closing out a tournament, the player whom ended up winning would give the 'loose change' from their win as a tip. I.E. say you take down a 100$ tournament in your local card room, and the top prize is something like $1,675, I've often seen players give the 75$. Normally second place would follow suit too. In bigger prize ...


6

Clarko's given some good pieces of advice. Most tournaments give you a 5-minute break every hour, so make good use of those! One thing I'd add is "pay attention to what your opponents are doing! Takes notes about things you see important to remember" This will make the experience much more interesting. If you just fold and forget about the tournament, you ...


5

I've wondered this question before too, but in the context of playing poker for free on Zynga where people do this all the time which is a little different from a tournament but much of the same basic reasoning applies. People who appear to just randomly go all in before the flop either don't know what they're doing or they know what they're doing and are ...


5

There are a lot of players who insta-shove a lot at the start of freerolls, I suspect on the grounds that they'll either double up and play from a strong position, or get knocked out and move on to the next one - either way avoiding having to spend a lot of time grinding away with an average or small stack, which presumably isn't their bag. That's what you ...


5

In most live tournaments, tables break according to a preset pattern, so that the tables can be reused for other games. For this reason, experienced players often adjust their playing style based on the table they are seated at. If they are at a table that breaks quickly, they know that they do not have time to build strong reads, and must instead take ...


5

My suggestion based off my own personal experience with house games is start with small buy-in tournaments. As the experience and comfort level grows, you can then either. Up the buy-in of the tournaments and/or transition into cash games. You can set the Buy-in caps of the cash games to limit the loss and keep the games friendly. To keep players from ...


5

See here: How are side pots built? . I don't think the rules about side pots will change if a player is so severely short stacked. In your particular case, I think it will be: Main Pot: 40 (10 from each player, since player 2 has the fewest chips) Side Pot 1: 60 (player 1 has 20 left, so players 3 and 4 also put 20 chips in. 3 x 20 = 60). Side Pot 2: 40 (...


5

What were the limits or the level of skill at play here? What's the difference in prize money between the finishing positions yet to be paid out? Without those details it's hard to say definitively, but no, the Hero did not play well here. Open-limping is generally a bad idea anyway, doubly so because you were technically short stacked, and even more so ...


5

At first, rank, as you define it, has nothing to do with the stages of a tournament. It has to do with a thing, called the M factor. M represents the number of orbits that you will survive if you never play a hand, if you fold immediately, when your chance is given. Its formula is: M=(Stack size)/(big blind+small blind+total antes) (you should add one ante ...


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